Heptameron of the Tales of Margaret, Queen of Navarre, Vol. 1 | Marguerite of Navarre | 3/3
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section 9 of the app tamarin of the tales of Margaret queen of Navarre for him 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by Anna Sewell the heptamer own of the tales of Margaret queen of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury section 9 first day tale one footnote the incidence of this story are historical had occurred in Allinson and Paris between 1520 and 1525 and footnote ladies said Simone – I've been so poorly rewarded for my long service that to avenge myself upon love and upon her who treats me so cruelly I shall be at pains to make a collection of all the ill turns that women have done to hapless man and moreover I will relate nothing but a simple truth in the town of Allanson during the lifetime of Charles the last Duke footnote the Duke Charles here alluded to is Margaret's first husband and footnote there was a Proctor named sent and young who had married a gentle woman of the neighborhood she was more beautiful than virtuous and on account of her beauty and light behavior was much sought after by the Bishop of seis who in order to compare his ends managed the husband so well that let another knee fail to perceive the fish's conduct of his wife and of the bishop but was further led to forget the affection he had always shown in the service of his master and mistress thus from being a loyal servant he became utterly adverse to them and at last sought outsourcers to procure the death of the duchess footnote this was of course margaret herself and footnote now for a long time the bishop consorted with this unhappy woman who submitted to him from Everest rather than from love and also because her husband urged her to show him favor but there was a youth in a town of Allinson son of the lefthand in general whom she loved so much that she was half crazy regarding him and she often availed herself of the bishop to have some commission and press it to her husband so that she might see the son of the lefthand and he was named de Menil at her ease this mode of life lasted a long time during which she had the bishop for her prophet and the said Duma knew for her pleasure to the letter she swore that she showed a fair countenance to the bishop only that their own love might the more freely continued that the bishop in spite of appearances had obtained only words from her and that he de Menil might rest assured that no man save himself should ever receive aught else one day when her husband was setting forth to visit the bishop she asked leave of him to go into the country saying that the heir the town was injurious to her and when she had arrived at her farm she forthwith ro to do manual to come and see her without fail at about 10 o'clock in the evening this the young man did but as he was entering at the gate he met the maid who was one to let him in and who said to him go elsewhere her friend for your place is taken supposing that the husband had arrived he asked her how matters stood the woman seeing that he was so handsome youthful and well-bred and was with also loving and yet so little loved took pity upon him and told him of his mistress's wantonness thinking that on hearing this he would be cured of loving her so much she related to him that the Bishop of says– had but just arrived and was now in bed with the lady a thing which the letter had not expected for he was not to have come until tomorrow however he had detained her husband at his house and had stolen away at night that comes secretly and see her if ever man was in despair it was de Menil who nevertheless was quite unable to believe the story he hid himself however in a house nearby and watched until three hours after midnight when he saw the bishop come forth disguised yet not so completely but that he could recognize him more readily than he desired the Menil in his despair returned to Allen soon whether likewise his wicked mistress soon came and went to speak to him thinking to deceive him according to her want but he told her that having touched sacred things she was too holy to speak to a sinner like himself albeit his repentance was so great that he hoped his sin would very soon be forgiven him when she learned that her deceit was found out and that excuses earth and promises never to act in a light way again were of no avail she complained of it to her bishop then having weighed the matter with him she went to her husband and told him that she could no longer dwell in the town of Allanson for the leftenant son whom he had so greatly esteemed among his friends pursued her unceasingly to rob her of her honour she therefore begged of him to abide it art and tongue in order that all suspicion might be removed the husband who suffered himself to be ruled by his wife consented but they had not long been at Arlington when this bad woman sent a message to do menu saying that he was the wickedest man in the world for she knew full well that he had spoken evilly of her and of the Bishop of says– however she would strive her best to make him repent of it the young man who had never spoken of the matter except to herself and who fear to fall into the bad graces of the bishop repair to our huntin with two of his servants and finding his mistress at Vespers in the church of the jacobins he went and knelt beside her and said I'm come hither madam to swear to you before God that I've never spoken of your honor to any person but yourself you treated me so ill that I did not make you half their approaches you deserved but if there be man or woman ready to say that I've ever spoken of the matter to them I'm here to give them the lying in your presence seeing that there were many people in the church and that he was accompanied by two stout serving men she forced herself to speak as graciously as she could she told him that she had no doubt he spoke the truth and that she deemed him too honorable a man to make evil report of anyone in world least a fool of herself who bore him so much friendship but since her husband had heard the matter spoken of she begged him to say in his presence that he had not so spoken and it not so believe to this he willingly agreed and wishing to attend her to her house he offered to take her arm but she told him it was not desirable that he should come with her for her husband would think that she had put these words into his mouth then taking one of his serving men by the sleeve she said leave me this man and as soon as it is time I will send him to seek you meanwhile the you go and rest in your lodging he having no suspicions of her conspiracy against him when thither she gave supper to the serving man whom she'd kept with her and who frequently asked her when it would be time to go and seek his master but she always replied that his master would come soon enough when it was night she sent one of her own serving man to fetch the man you and he having no suspicion of the mischief that was being prepared for him went boldly to sentence house as his mistress was still entertaining his servant there he had but one with himself just as he was entering the house the servant who had been sent to him told him that the lady wished to speak with him before he saw her husband and that she was waiting for him in a room where she was alone with his own serving man he would therefore do well to send his other servant away by the front door this he did then while he was going up the small dark stairway the Proctor sent Daniel who had placed some men in ambush in a closet heard the noise and the man at what it was whereupon he was told that a man was trying to enter secretly into his house at the moment a certain Thomas Garin a murderer by trade who had been hired by the proctor for the purpose came forward and gave the poor young man so many sword thrusts that whatever defense he was able to make could not save him from falling dead in their midst meanwhile the servant was waiting with the lady said to her I hear my master speaking on the stairway I will go to him but the lady stopped him and said do not trouble yourself you come soon enough a little while afterwards the servant hearing his master say I'm dying may God receive my soul wish to go to his assistance will the lady again withheld him saying don't trouble yourself my husband is only chastising him for his Follies we will go and see what it is then leading over the balustrade at the top of the stairway she asked her husband well is it done come and see he replied I have now avenged you on the man who put you to such shame so saying he drove a dagger that he was holding ten or twelve times into the belly of a man whom alive he would not have dared to assail when the murder had been accomplished and the two servants of the dead man had fled to carry the tidings to the unhappy father Santonio bethought himself that the matter could not be kept secret but he reflected that the testimony of the dead man's servants would not be believed and that no one in his house had seen the deed done except the murderers and an old woman servant and a girl fifteen years of age he secretly tried to seize the old woman but finding means to escape out of his hands she sought sanctuary with the jacobins and was afterwards the most trustworthy witness of the murder the young maid remained for a few days in sentinels house but he found means to have her led astray by one of the murderers and had her conveyed to a brothel in Paris so that her testimony might not be received to conceal the murder he calls the corpse of the helpless dead man to be burned and the bones which were not consumed by the fire he caused to be placed in some mortar in a part of his house where he was building then he sent in all haste to the court to sue for pardon setting forth that he had several times forbidden his house to a person who was suspected of plotting his wife's dishonour and who notwithstanding his prohibition had come by night to see her in a suspicious fashion where upon finding him in the act of entering her room his anger had got the better of his reason and he had killed him but before he was able to dispatch his letter to the Chandler's the Duke and Duchess had been apprised by the unhappy father of a matter and they sent a message to the chancellor to prevent the granting of the pardon finding he could not obtain it the wretched man fled to England with his wife and several of his relations but before setting out he told a murderer who at his and treaty had done the deed that he had seen expresses from the king directing that he should be taken and put to death nevertheless on account of the service that he'd rendered him he desired to save his life and he gave him ten crowns are with to leave the kingdom the murderer did this and was afterwards seen no more the murder was so fully proven by the servants of the dead man by the woman who had taken refuge with the Jacobins and by the bones that were found in the mortar that legal proceedings were begun and completed in the absence of sand on young and his wife they were judged by default and were both condemned to death their property was confiscated to the Prince and fifteen hundred crowns were to be given to the dead man's father to pay the costs of the trial Sentinel being in England and perceiving that in the eyes of the law he was dead in France by means of his services to diverse great lords and by the favour of his wife's relations induced the King of England to request the King of France to grant him a pardon and restore him to his possessions and honors but the king of France having been informed of the wickedness and enormity of the crime sent the process to the king of England praying him to consider whether the offence was one deserving of pardon and telling him that no one in the kingdom but the Duke of Allanson had the right to grant a pardon in that Duchy however notwithstanding all his excuses he failed to appease the King of England who continued to entreat him so very pressingly that at his request the proctor at last received a pardon and so returned to his own home footnote the letters of remission which were granted to sentinel on this occasion will be found in the appendix of the first day it will be noted that Margaret in her story gives various particulars which Sentinel did not fail to conceal in view of obtaining his pardon and footnote there the completest wickedness he consorted with a sorcerer named gallery hoping that by this man's art he might escape payment of the fifteen hundred crowns that that man's father to this end he went in disguise to Paris with his wife she finding that he used to shut himself up for a great while in a room with gallery without acquainting her with a reason there of spied upon him one morning and perceived gallery showing him five wooden images three of which had her hands hanging down whilst two had them lifted up we must make wax and images like these said gallery speaking to the proctor such as have her arms hanging down will be for those whom we shall call said I and the others with their arms raised will be if the persons from whom you would fain have love and favor this one said the Proctor shall be for the king by whom I would fain be loved and this one from Monsignor Bremen Chancellor of Allison the images said gallery must be set under the altar to hear mass with words that I will presently tell you to say then speaking of those images that had their arms lowered the proctor said that one should be for mastershield demon you father of the dead man for he knew that as long as the father lived he would not cease to pursue him moreover one of the women with her hands hanging down was to be for the Duchess of Allen soon sister to the King for she bore so much loved her old servant do man you and had in so many other matters become acquainted with a practice wickedness that except she died he could not live the second woman that had her arms hanging down was own wife who was the cause of all his misfortune and who he felt sure would never amend her evil life when his wife who could see everything through the keyhole heard him placing her among the dead she resolved to send him among them first on pretends of going to borrow some money she went to an uncle she had named no Fleur who was master of requests to the Duke of Allinson and informed him of what she had seen and heard Knopfler like the old and worthy sir that he was went forthwith to the chancellor valance and told him the whole story as the Duke and Duchess of Orleans who were not at court that day that Chancellor related this strange business to the regent mother of the king and the Duchess and she sent it all haste for the Provost of Paris who made such speed that he had once seized the Proctor and a sorcerer gallery without constraint or torture they freely confessed their guilt and their case was made out and laid before the King certain persons wishing to save our lives told him that they had only sought his good graces by their enchantments but the King holding his sister's life as dear as his own commanded that the same sentence should be passed on them as if they had made an attempt on his own person however his sister the Duchess of Allen saw and treated that the purchased life might be spared and the sentence of death be commuted to some heavy punishment this request was granted her and sent onion and gallery were sent to the galleys of San Blanca at Marseilles where they ended their days in closed captivity and at leisure to ponder in the grievousness of their crimes the wicked wife in the absence of her husband continued in her sinful ways even more than before and at last died in wretchedness I pray you ladies consider what evil is caused by a wicked woman and how many evils sprang from the sins that the one I've spoken of you will find that ever since Eve caused Adam to sin all women have set themselves to bring about the torment slaughter and damnation of men for myself I have had such experience of her cruelty that I expect to die and be damned simply by reason of the despair into which one of them has caused me and yet so great a fool am i that I cannot but confess that hell coming from her hand is more pleasing than paradise would be from the hand of another Parliament pretending she did not understand that it was touching herself he spoke in this fashion said to him since he'll is as pleasant as you say you ought not to fear the devil who has placed you in it if my devil were to become as black as he has been cruel to me answered semen – angrily he would cause the present company as much fright as I find pleasure in looking upon them but the fires of love make me forget those of this hell however to speak no further concerning this matter I give my vote to Madam Wasi to tell the second story I feel sure she would support my opinion if you are willing to say what she knows about women fourth with all the company turned towards quasi and backed of her to proceed to which he consented and laughing began as follows it seems to me ladies that he who has given me his vote has spoken so ill of our sex in his true story of a wicked woman that I must call to mind all the years of my long life to find one whose virtue will suffice the gain say his evil opinion however as I've bethought me of one worthy to be remembered I will now relate her history to you end of section 9 section 10 of the heptamer own of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre for him 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by Anna Sewell they have tamron of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre for him won by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury first-day tale – in the town of Amboise there was a mill tear in the service of the queen of Navarre sister to King Francis first of that name she being applauded where she been brought to bed of a son the aforesaid mill tear went fiddler to receive his quarterly payment while his wife remained at Amboise in a lodging beyond the bridges now it happened that one of her husband's servants had long loved her exceedingly and one day he could not refrain from speaking of it she however being a truly his woman rebuked him so severely threatened to have him beaten and dismissed by her husband but from that time forth he did not venture to speak to her in any such way again or to let his love be seen but kept the fire hidden within his breast until the day when his master had gone from home and his mistress was at Vespers at San Florentin Castle Church a long way from the muties house whilst he was alone the fancy took him that he might obtain by force but neither prayer nor service had a failed to procure him and accordingly he broke through a wooden partition which was between the chamber where his mistress slept and his own the curtains of his master's bed on the one side and of the servants bed on the other so covered the walls as to hide the opening he had made and thus his wickedness was not perceived until his mistress was in bed together with a little girl 11 or 12 years old when the poor woman was in her first sleep the servant in his shirt and would his naked sword in his hand came through the opening it made in the wall into her bed but as soon as she felt him beside her she left out addressing to him all such reproaches as a virtuous woman might other his love however was but bestial and he would have better understood the language of his mules than her honorable reasonings indeed he showed himself even more beastial and the beasts with whom he had long consulted finding she ran so quickly around the table that he could not catch her and that she was strong enough to break away from him twice he despaired of ravishing her alive and dealt her terrible sword trust in a loins thinking that if fear and force had not brought her to yield pain would assuredly do so the contrary however happened for just as a good soldier on seeing his own blood is the more fire to take vengeance on his enemies and win renown so her chaste heart got a new strength as she ran fleeing from the hands of the miscreant saying to him the while all she could think of to bring him to see his guilt but so filled was he with rage that he paid no heed to her he tailed her several more thrusts to avoid which she continued running as long as her legs could carry her when after great loss of blood she felt that death was near she lifted her eyes to heaven clasped her hands and gave thanks to God calling him her strength her patience and her virtue and praying him to accept her blood which had been shed for the keeping of his commandment and in reverence of his son through whom she firmly believed all her sins to be washed away and blotted out from the remembrance of his wrath as she was uttering the word Lord received the soul that has been redeemed by thy goodness she fell upon her face to the ground then the miscreant dealt her several thrusts and when she had lost both power of speech and strength of body and was no longer able to make any defence he ravished her having thus satisfied his wicked lust he fled in haste and in spite of all pursuit was never seen again the little girl who was in bed with the mule to his wife had hidden herself under the bed in her fear but on seeing up a man was gone she came to her mistress finding her to be without speech or movement she called to the neighbors from the window for Aid and as they loved and esteemed her mistress as much as any woman that belonged to the town they came forth with bringing surgeons with them a letter found that she'd received twenty-five mortal wounds in her body and although they did what they could to help her it was all in vain nevertheless she lingered for an hour longer without speaking yet making signs with eye and hand to show that she had not lost her understanding being asked by a priest in what faith she died she answered by signs as plain as any speech that she placed her hope of salvation in Jesus Christ alone and so with glad countenance and eyes appraised heaven her chaste body yielded up its soul to his creator just as the oops having been laid out and shrouded was placed at the door to await the burial company the poor husband arrived and beheld his wife's body in front of his house before he had even received tidings of her death he inquired the cause of this and found that he had double occasion to grieve and his grief was indeed so great that it nearly killed him this martyr of chasity was buried in the Church of San Florentin and as was their duty all the upright women of em was filled not to show her every possible honor deeming themselves fortunate in belonging to a town where so virtuous a woman had been found and seeing the honour that was shown to deceased such women as were wanton and unchaste resolved amend their lives this ladies is a true story which should incline us more strongly to preserve the fair virtue of chastity we who are of gentle blood should die of shame on feeling in our hearts that worldly lust to avoid which the poor wife of a mule Tia shrank not from so cruel a death some esteem themselves virtuous women who have never liked this one resisted unto the shedding of blood it is fitting that we should humble ourselves for God does not fail to save his grace to men because of our birth or riches but according as it pleases his own good will he pays no regard to persons but chooses according to his purpose and he whom he chooses he honors with all virtues and often he chooses the lowly to confound those whom the world exalts and honors for as he himself hath told us let us not rejoice in our merits but rather because our names are written in the book of life from which nor death nor hell nor sin can blot them out there was not a lady in the company but at tears of compassion in her eyes for the pitiful and glorious death or the munities wife each thought within herself that should fortune serve her in the same way she would strive to this poor woman in her martyrdom was he however perceiving that time was being lost in praising the dead woman said to suffered on unless you can tell us something that will make the company laugh I think none of them will forgive me for the fault I've committed in making them weep wherefore I give you my vote for your telling of the third story Safra Don who would gladly have her accounted something agreeable to the company and above all to one amongst the ladies said that it was not for him to speak seeing that there were others older and better instructed than himself who should have right come first nevertheless since a lot had fallen upon himself he would rather have done with it at once for the more numerous the good speakers before him the worst with his own tale appear end of section 10 section 11 of the heptamer on of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by Anna Simone they have tamron of the tales of Margaret queen of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury day 1 tale 3 footnote this story is historical the events occurred at Naples circa 1450 and footnote I've often desired ladies to be a sharer in the good fortune of the man whose story I'm about to relate to you you must know that in a time of King Alfonso whose lust was the sceptre of his kingdom there lived in the town of Naples a gentleman so honorable calmly and pleasant that his perfections angio's an old gentleman to give him his daughter in marriage she filed with her husband in Gray's and communists and there was great love between them until a certain day in carnival time on the king went masked from house to house all strove to give him the best welcome they could but when he came to this gentleman's house he was under tained better than anywhere else went with sweetmeats and singers and music and further the fairest woman that to his thinking he had ever seen at the end of the feast she sang a song with her husband in so graceful of fashion that she seemed more beautiful than ever the king perceiving so many perfections United in one person was not over pleased at the gentle harmony between the husband and wife and deliberated how he might destroy it the chief difficulty he met with was in the great affection which he observed existed between them and on this account he hid his passion in his heart as deeply as he could to relieve it in some measure he gave many entertainments to the lords and ladies of Naples and at these the gentleman and his wife were not forgotten now in as much as men willingly believe what they'll desire it seemed to the king that the glances of his lady gave him fair promise of future happiness if only she were not restrained by her husband's presence accordingly that he might learn whether his surmise was true the King entrusted a commission to the husband and sent him on a journey to Rome for a fortnight or three weeks as soon as the gentleman was gone his wife who had never before been separated from him was in great distress but the King comforted her as often as he was able with gentle persuasions and presence so that at last she was not only consoled but well pleased with her husband's absence before the three weeks were over at the end of which he was to be home again she had come to be so deeply in love with the king that her husband's return was no less displeasing to her than his departure had been not wishing to be deprived of the Kings Society she agreed with him that whenever her husband went to his country house she would give him notice of it he might then visit her in safety and with such secrecy that her honour which he regarded more than her conscience would not suffer having this hope the lady continued a very cheerful mind and when her husband arrived she welcomed him so heartily that even had he been told that the King had sought her in his absence he would have had no suspicion in course of time however the flame that is so difficult of concealment began to show itself and the husband having a strong inkling of the truth kept good watch by which means he was well-nigh convinced nevertheless as he feared that the man who wronged him would treat him still worse if he appeared to notice it he resolved to dissemble holding it better to live in trouble and to risk his life for a woman who had cease to love him in his vexation of spirit however he resolved if he could to retort upon the king and knowing that women especially such as our lofty and honourable minds are more moved by resentment than by love he made bold one day while speaking with the Queen to tell her that it moved his pity to see her so little loved by the king the queen who had heard of the affection that existed within the king and the gentleman's wife replied I cannot have both honor and pleasure together i well know that I have the honour whilst another has to pleasure and in the same way she you as the pleasure has not the honor that is mine thereupon the gentleman who understood full well at whom these words were aimed replied Madame honor is inborn with you for your lineage is such that no title whether of queen or Empress could be an increase of nobility yet your beauty Grace and virtue are well deserving of pleasure and she who Rob's you of what is yours does a greater wrong to herself than to you seeing that for a glory which is turned to her shame she loses as much pleasure as you or any lady in the realm could enjoy I can truly tell you Madame that were the King to lay aside his crown he would not possess any advantage over me in satisfying a lady I am sure that to content one so worthy as yourself he would indeed be pleased to change his temperament for mine the Queen laughed and replied the King may be of a less vigorous temperament than you yet a love he bears me contends me well and I prefer it to any other madam said the gentleman if that were so I should have no pity for you I feel sure that you would be well pleased the like of your own verges love were found in the king's heart but God has withheld this from you in order that not finding what you desire and your husband you may not make him your God on earth I confess to you said the Queen the love I bear him is so great that the light could not be found in any other heart but mine pardon me madam said the gentleman you have not fathom the love of every heart I will be so bold as to tell you that you are loved by one whose love is so great and measureless that your own is as nothing beside it the more he perceives that the Kings love fails you the more does his own wax an increase in such wise that were at your pleasure he might be recompense for all you have lost the Queen began to perceive both from these words from the gentleman's countenance that what he said came from the death of his heart she remembered also that for a long time he had so zealously sought to do her service that had fallen into sadness she had hitherto deemed this to be on account of his wife but now she was firmly of belief that it was for love of herself moreover the very quality of love which compels itself to be recognized when his unfeigned made her feel certain of what had been hidden from everyone as she looked at the gentleman who was far more worthy of being loved than her husband she reflected that he was forsaken by his wife as she herself was by the king and then be set by vexation and jealousy against her husband as well as moved by the love of the gentleman she began with sighs and tearful eyes to say me shall revenge with me where love has been of no avail the gentleman who understood what these words meant replied vengeance madam is sweet when in plays of slaying an enemy it gives life to a true lover me things it is time that truth should cause you to abandon the foolish love you bear to one who loves you not and that are just and reasonable love should banish fear which cannot dwell in a noble and virtuous heart come madam that has set aside the greatness of your station and consider that of all men and women in the world we are the most deceived betrayed and be mocked by those whom we have most truly loved let us avenge ourselves madam not so much to requite them in the way they deserve and to satisfy that love which for my own part I cannot continue to endure and live and I think that unless your heart be harder than Flint or daimond you cannot but feel some spark from the fires which only increase the more I seek to conceal them if pity for me Who am dying of love for you does not move you to love me at least pity for yourself should do so you are so perfect that you deserve to win the heart of every honorable man in the world yet your contempt and forsaken by him for whose sake you've scorned all others on hearing these words the Queen was so greatly moved that for fear of showing in her countenance that trouble of her mind she took the gentleman's arm and went forth into a garden that was closed her apartment there she walked to and fro for a long time without being able to say a word to him the gentleman saw that she was half won and when they were at the end of the path where none could see them he made a very full declaration of the love which he had so long hidden from her they found that they were of one mind in the matter and enacted the vengeance which they were no longer able to forego moreover they there agreed that whenever their husband went into the country and the King left the castle to visit the wife in the town the gentleman should always return and come to the castle to see the Queen thus the deceivers being themselves deceived all four would share in the pleasures that two of them had thought to keep themselves when the agreement had been made the Queen returned to her apartment and the gentleman to his house both being so well pleased that they had forgotten all their former troubles the jealousy they had previously felt that the king's visits the lady was now changed that his are so that gentleman went oftener than usual to his house in the country which was only half a league distant as soon as the king was advised of his departure he never failed to go and see the lady and the gentleman one night was come he took himself to the castle to the Queen where he did duty as the Kings leftenant and so secretly that none ever discovered it this manner of life lasted for a long time but as the king was a person of public condition he could not conceal his love sufficiently well to prevent it from coming at length to the knowledge of everyone and all honorable people felt great pity for the gentleman though divers malicious youth were wanted to ride him by making homes at him behind his back but he knew of their derision and it gave him great pleasure that he came to think as highly of his horns as of the king's crown one day however the king and the gentleman's wife noticing a stag's head that was set up in the gentleman's house could not refrain in his presence from laughing and saying that the head was suited to the house soon afterwards the gentleman who was no less spirited than the King caused the following words to be written over the Stags head yo Portola corner kiosk on Nevada Matala poor taxi no look lead foot note all men may see the homes I've got but one where's homes and knows it not and footnote when the king came again to the house he observed these lines newly written and inquired their meaning of the gentleman who said if the Kings secret be hidden from the subject it is not fitting that the subject secret should be revealed to the king be content with knowing that those who wear horns do not always have their caps raised from their heads some horns are so soft that they never unkept one and especially are they light to him who thinks he has them not the king perceived by these words that the gentleman knew something of his own behavior but he never had any suspicion at the love between him and the Queen for the more pleased the latter was with a life led by her husband the more that she feigned to be distressed by it and so on either side they lived in this love until at last old age took them in hand here ladies is a story by which you may be guided for as I willingly confess it shows you that when your husband's if you Bucks hones you can give them stacks horns in return I'm quite sure suffer don't began in a seat laughing but if you still love as Article II as you were formerly want to do you would submit to Holmes as big as oak trees if only you might repay them as you pleased however now that your hair is growing gray it is time to leave your desires in peace fair lady said safranin though I be robbed of hope by the woman I love and of ardor by old age it lies not in my power to weaken my inclination since you have rebuked me for so honorable desire I give you my vote for the telling of the fourth tale that we may see whether you can bring forward some example to refute me during this converse one of the ladies fell to laughing heartily knowing that she who took Sarandon's words to herself was not so loved by him that he would have suffered Holmes shame or wrong for her sake when suffer don't perceived over the lady who laughed understood him he was well satisfied and became silent so that in a sweet might begin which he did as follows in order ladies that suffered all and the rest of the company may know that old ladies are not like the Queen has spoken of and that all foolhardy and venture sir men do not come past their ends I will tell you a story in which I will acquaint you with the opinion of a lady who deemed a fixation of failure and love to be harder of endurance than death itself however I shall give no names because the events are so fresh in people's minds that I should fear to offend some who are near of kin end of section 11 section 12 of heptamer on of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by honest among the heptamer on of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury first-day tale for footnote this story is historical and the incidence must have occurred between 1520 and 1525 and footnote there lived in a land of Flanders a lady of such high lineage that none more illustrious could be found she was a widow both her first and second husband's being dead and she had no children living during her widowhood she lived in retirement with her brother by whom she was greatly loved and he was a very great Lord and married to the daughter of a king this young prince was a man much given to pleasure fond of hunting pastimes and women at his youth inclined him he had a wife father who was of a very fluid disposition and found no pleasure in her husband's pursuits where full this Lord always took his sister along with his wife for she was a most joyous and pleasant companion and withal a discreet and honorable wound in this Lord's household there was a gentleman who for stature comeliness and grace surpassed all his fellows this gentleman perceiving that his master's sister was of merry mood and always ready for a laugh was minded to try whether the offer of an honorable love would be displeasing to her he made this of but the answer that he received from her was contrary to his desires however although her reply was such as beseem de princess and a woman of true virtue she readily pardoned his hardihood for the sake of his commoners and breeding and let him know that she bore him no ill will for what he had said but she charged him never to speak to her after that fashion again and this he promised that he might not lose the pleasure and honour of her conversation nevertheless as time went on his love so increased that he forgot the promise he had made he did not however risk further trial of words forget learned by experience and much against his will what virtuous replies she was able to make but he reflected that if he could take her somewhere at a disadvantage she being a widow young lusty and of a lively humour would purchase take pity on him and on herself the Compass's ends he told his master that excellent hunting was to be had in the neighborhood of his house and that if it pleased him to repair theatre and hunt three or four stags in a month of May he could have no finer sport the Lord granted the gentleman's request as much for the affection he bore him as for the pleasure of the chase and repair to his house which was as handsome and as fairly ordered as that of the richest gentleman in the land the Lord and his lady were lodged on one side of the house and she whom the gentleman loved more than himself on the other her apartment was so well arranged Terra Street above and matted below that it was impossible to perceive a track duel which was by the side of her bed and which opened into a room beneath that was occupied by the gentleman's mother she being an old lady somewhat troubled by room and fearfulness the cuff she had should disturb the princess maid exchange of chambers with her son in the evening this old lady was one to bring sweet meat to the princess for her collation at which the gentleman was present and being greatly beloved by her brother and intimate with him he was also suffered to be present when she rose in the morning and when she retired to bed on which occasions he always found reasons for an increase of his affection does it came to pass that one evening he made the princess stay up very late until at last being desires of sleep she bade him leave her he then went to his own room and they're put on the handsomest and best scented shirt he had and a nightcap so well adorned that nothing was lacking in it it seemed to him as he looked at himself in his mirror that no lady in the world could deny herself to one of his comeliness and grace he therefore promised himself a happy issue to his enterprise and so lay down on his bed wherein is desire and sure hope of exchanging it for one more honorable and pleasant he looked to make no very long stay as soon as he had dismissed all his attendants he rose to fasten the door after them and for a long time he listened to hear whether there were any sound in the room of the princes which was above his own when he had made sure that all was quiet he wished to begin his pleasant task and little by little let down the trapdoor which was so excellently wrought and so well covered with cloth that had made not the least noise nanny ascended into the room and came to the bedside of his lady who was just fallen asleep forth with having no regard for the duty that he owed his mistress over the house to which he belonged he got into bed with her without entreating her permission or making any kind of ceremony she felt him in her arms before she knew that he'd entered the room but being strong she freed herself from his grasp and fell to striking biting and scratching him demanding the while to know who he was so that for fear lest she should call out he saw to stop her mouth with abet clothes but this he found it impossible to do for when she saw that he was using all his strength to work her shame she did as much to baffle him she further called as loudly as she could to her lady of honour who slept in her room and this old and virtuous woman ran to her mistress in her nightdress when the gentleman saw that he was discovered he was so fearful of being recognized by the lady that he descended in all haste through this trapdoor his despair at returning in such an evil plight being no less than his desire and assurance of a gracious reception had previously been he found his mirror and candle on his table and looking at his face old bleeding from the ladies scratches and bites once the blood was trickling over his fine shirt which had now more blood than gold about it he said beauty now has thou been rewarded according to thy deserts by reason of their vain promises I attempted an impossible undertaking and one that instead of increasing my happiness will perchance double my misfortune I feel sure that if she knows I made this foolish attempt contrary to the promise I gave her I shall lose the honorable and accustomed companionship which more than any other I've had with her and my folly has well deserved this for if I was to turn my good looks and grace to any account I ought not to have hidden them in the darkness I should not have sought to take that chaste body by force but should have waited in long service and humble patience till love at Concord her without love all men's merits and might are of no avail thus he passed the night in tears regrets and Serling's such as I cannot describe and in the morning finding his face greatly tone he feigned grievous sickness and to be unable to endure the light until the company had left his house the lady who had come off victorious knew that there was no man at her brother's coat that there's the tenth such an enterprise save him who had had the boldness to declare his love to her she therefore concluded that it was indeed her host and made search through the room with a lady of honour to discover how he could have entered it but in this she failed whereupon she said her companion in great anger you may be sure that it can have been none other and the Lord of this house and I will make such report of him to my brother in the morning that his head shall bear witness to my chastity seeing her in such wrath the lady of honour said to her right glad am i madam to find you esteem your honor so highly that to exalt it you would not spare the life of a man who for the love he bears you has put it to this risk but it often happens that one lessons would one things to increase we're full I pray you madam tell me the truth of the whole matter when a lady had fully related the business the lady of honor said to her you assured me they had nothing from you save only scratches and blows I do assure you that it was so said the lady and unless he find a rare surgeon I am certain his face will bear the marks tomorrow well since it is thus madam said the lady of honor it seems to me that you have more reason to thank God than to think of vengeance for you may well believe that since the gentleman had speared enough to make such an attempt his grief at having failed will be harder of endurance than any death he could award him if you desire to be revenged on him let love and shame do their work they will tremendum more grievously than could you and if you would speak out for your honors sake beware madam lest you fall into a mishap like to his own he instead of obtaining the greatest delight he could imagine has encountered the gravest fixation any gentleman could angira so you Madame thinking to exalt your honour may protons diminish it if you make complaint you'll bring to light what is known to none for you may rest assured that the gentleman on his side will never reveal all the matter and even if my lord your brother should do justice to him at your asking and the poor gentleman should die yet would it everywhere be noised abroad that he had had his will of you and most people would say it was unlikely a gentleman would make such an attempt unless the lady had given him great encouragement you are young and fair you live gaily withal and there is no one at court but has seen the kind treatment you have shown to the gentleman whom you suspect hence everyone will believe that if he did this deed it was not without some fold on your side and your honor for which he have never had to blush will be freely questioned wherever the story is related on hearing the excellent reasoning of her lady of honor the princess perceived that she spoke the truth and that she herself would would just cause be blamed on account of the close friendship which had always shown to its the gentleman accordingly she inquired of her lady of honor what she ought to do Madame replied the other since you are pleased to receive my counsels having regard for the affection once they spring it seems to me you should be glad at heart to think that the most comely and gallant gentleman I've ever seen was not able whether by love or by fools to turn you for the path of true virtue for this madam you should humble yourself before God and confess that it was not through your own merit for many women who have led straighter lives than you have been humiliated by men less worthy of love than he and he should henceforth be more than ever on your guard against proposals of love for many have the second time yielded to dangers which on the first occasion they were able to avoid be mindful Madame that love is blind and that it makes people blind in such wise that the way appears safest just when it is most slippery further Madame it seems to me that you should give no sign of what has befallen you whether to him or to anyone else and that if he seeks to say anything on the matter you should fain not to understand him in this way you will avoid two dangers the one vain glory in the victory you have one and the other of recalling things so pleasant to the flesh that mention of them that chases can only with difficulty avoid feeling some sparks of the flame though they strive their utmost escape them besides this Madame in order that he may not think he has done anything pleasing in your sight I am of opinion you should little by little withdraw their friendship you have been in the habit of showing him in this way he will know how much you scorn his rashness and how great is your goodness since content with the victory that God has given you you seek no further vengeance upon him and may God give you grace madam to continue in the virtue he has placed in your heart and knowing that all good things come from him may you love and serve Him better than before the prince is determined to abide by the advice of a lady of honor and then fell asleep with joy as great as was the sadness of her waking lover on the morrow the Lord her brother wishing to depart inquired for his host and was told that he was too ill to bear the light or to hear anyone speak the prince was greatly astonished at this and wished to go and see the gentleman however learning that he was asleep he would not awake him but left the house without bidding him farewell he took with him his wife and sister and a letter hearing the excuse is sent by the gentleman who would not see the prince or any of the company before their departure felt convinced that it was indeed he who had so tormented her and that he Durst not let the marks which he had left upon his face be seen and although his master frequently sent for him he did not return the court until he was quite healed of always wounds save only one namely that which love and vexation had dealt to his heart when he did return and found himself in presence of his victorious foe he could not but blush and such was his confusion that he had formerly been the boldest of all the company was often wholly abashed before her accordingly being now quite certain that her suspicion was true she estranged herself from him little by little though not so adroitly that he did not perceive it but he does not give any sign for fear of meeting with something still worse and so he kept his love concealed patiently and during the disgrace he had so well deserved this ladies is a story which should be a warning to those who would grasp it was does not belong to them and which further should strengthen the hearts of ladies since it shows the virtue of his young princess and the good sense of her Lady of Honor if the light fortune should befall any among you the remedy has now been pointed out it seems to me said here come that the tall gentleman of whom you have told us was so lacking in spirit as to be unworthy of being remember would such an opportunity is that he ought not have suffered anyone older young to baffle him in his app enterprise it must be said also that his heart was not entirely filled with love seeing that fear of death and shame found place within it and what replied no her feet could the poor gentleman have done with two women against him he oughta have killed the old one said heheh and when the young one found herself without assistance she would have been already half subdued to have killed her said no my feet then he would turn a lover into a murderer since such as your opinion it would indeed be a fearful thing to fall into your hands if I had gone so far said hecka I should have fell it dishonorable not to achieve my purpose then said shrivel you think it strange that a Prince's bread and all honor should prove difficult of capture to one man you should then be much more astonished at a poor woman who escaped out of the hands of two rivo all said in a sweet I give my vote to you to tell the fifth tale for I think you know something concerning this poor woman that will not be displeasing to us since you have chosen me said gibble I will tell you a story which I know to be true from having made inquiries concerning it on the spot by this story you will see that womanly sense and virtue are not in the hearts and heads of princesses alone nor love and cunning in such as our most often deemed to possess them end of section 12 section 13 of the heptamer on of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by on ocimum lab tamron of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury day 1 tale 5 at the Haven of Coulomb near New York there lived a boat woman who day or night did nothing but curve a passengers across the ferry now a chance that two gray friars from New York were crossing the river alone with her and as the passage is one of the longest in France they began to make love to her that she might not feel dull by the way she returned them the answer that was do but they being neither fatigued by their journeying nor cooled by the water nor put a shame by a refusal determined to take her by force and if she Clement to throw her into the river she however well as virtuous and clever as they were grows in wicked and said to them I am not so ill disposed as I seem to be but I pray you grant me to requests you shall then see that I am more ready to give than you are to ask the friar swore to her by their good st. Francis that she could ask nothing that they would not grant in order to have what they desired of her first of all she said I require you both to promise on earth that you will inform no man living of this matter this they promised right willingly then she continued I would have you take your pleasure with me one after the other for it would be too great a shame for me to have to do with one in presence or the other consider which of you will have me first they deemed her request a very reasonable one and the younger fryer yielded the first place of the elder then as they were drawing near a little island she said to the younger one good father say your prayers here until I've taken your companion to another Island then if he praises me when he comes back we will leave him here and go away and turn together the younger friar left out onto the island to await the return of his comrade whom the boat woman took away with her to another Island when he had reached the bank she said to him pretending the while to fasten her boat to a tree look my friend and see where we can place ourselves the good father stepped onto the island to seek for a convenient spot but no sooner did she see him on land then she struck her foot against the tree and went off with her boat into the open stream leaving both the good fathers to their deserts and crying out to them as loudly as she could wait now so still the angel of God comes to console you for you shall have not that could please you from me today the two poor monks perceiving that they have been deceived knelt down at the water's edge and besought her not to put them to such shame and they promised that they would ask nothing of her if she would of our goodness take them to the Haven but still rowing away she said to them I should be doubly foolish if after escaping out of your hands I were to put myself into them again when she had come to the village she went to call her husband and the ministers of justice that they might go and take these fierce wolves for moose fangs she had by the grace of God escaped they set out accompanied by many people for there was no one big or little but wished to share in the pleasure of this chase when the poor brethren saw such a large company approaching they hid themselves each in his island even as Adam did when he perceived his nakedness in the presence of God shame said their sin clearly before them and the fear of punishment made them tremble so that they were half dead nevertheless they were taken prisoners amid the mockings and hootings of men and women some said these good fathers preached chastity to us and then robbed our wives of theirs other said they are like unto whited sepulchers which indeed appear beautiful outward but are within full of dead men's bones and uncleanness then another voice cried by their fruits shall you know what manner of trees they are you may be sure that all the passages in the gospel condemning hypocrites were brought forward against the unhappy prisoners who were however rescued and delivered by their warden who came in all haste to claim them assuring the ministers of justice that he would visit them with a greater punishment and layman would avenge her to inflict and that they should make reparation by saying as many masses and prayers as might be required the judge granted the wardens request and gave the prisoners up to him and the warden who was an upright man so dealt with them that they never afterwards crossed a river without making the sign of the Cross and recommending themselves to God I pray you ladies consider since this poor boat woman had the wit to received to such evil man what should be done by those who have read of and witnessed so many fair examples and who have had the goodness of virtuous ladies ever before their eyes indeed the virtue of well-bred women is not so much to be called virtue as habit it is in the women who know nothing who hear scarcely two good sermons during the whole year who have no leisure to think of old save the gaining of their miserable livelihood and who nevertheless jealously guard their chastity hard-pressed as they may be it is in such women as these that one discovers the virtue that is natural to the heart where man's wit and might our smallest there the Spirit of God performs the greatest work and unhappy indeed is the lady who keeps not close ward over the treasure which brings her so much honour if it be well guarded and so much shame if it be neglected it seems to me gibble said know Janine that there is no great virtue in refusing a grey friar and it would rather be impossible to love one longer in her plight gabacho they who are not accustomed to such lovers as yours do by no means despise the Greyfriars for the letter r as handsome and as strong as we are and they are ready er and fresher also for we are worn out with our service moreover they talk like angels and are as important 't as a devil so that such women as I've never seen other robes and their course drugget ones are truly virtuous when they escape out of her hands in faith said no my feet in a loud voice you may say what you like but I would rather be thrown into the river and lie with a grey friar so you can swim well said was he laughing no my feet it took this question in bad part for she thought that she was esteemed by was he less highly than she desired accordingly she answered in anger there are some who have refused more agreeable men than grave runners without blowing a trumpet about it was SIA laugh to see her so wrathful and said to her still less do they beat a drum about what they've done and granted I see said cable that no my feet wishes to speak I therefore give her my vote that she may relieve her heart and tongue us some excellent story well it's just been said replied no my feet touches me so little that it affords me neither pleasure nor pain however since I have your vote I pray you listen to me whilst I show that although one woman used cunning for a good purpose others have been crafty for evils sake since we have swooned to tell the truth I will not hide it for just as the boat woman's virtue brings no honor to other women unless they follow her example so the vice of another cannot disgrace her wherefore listen end of section 13 section 14 of the app tamarin of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by honest among the heptamer own of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury day 1 tales 6 there was in the service of Charles last duke of Allinson an old Fallot who had lost an eye and he was married to a wife much younger than himself now since his master mistress liked him as well as any man of his condition that was in their service he was not able to visit his wife as often as he could have wished owing to this she so far forgot her honor and conscience as to fall in love with a young man and the affair being at last noised abroad the husband heard of it he could not believe it however on account of the many notable tokens of love that were shown him by his wife nevertheless he one day determined to put the matter to the test and to take revenge if you were able on the woman who had put him to such shame for this purpose he pretended to go away to a place a short distance off for the space of two or three days as soon as he was gone his wife sent for her lover but he had not been with her for half an hour when the husband arrived and knocked loudly at the door the wife well knew who it was and told her lover who was so great he confounded that he would fain have been in his mother's womb and cursed both his mistress and a love that brought him into such peril however she bade him fear nothing for she would devise a means to get him away without harm or shame to him and she told him to dress himself as quickly as he could all this time the husband was knocking at the door and calling to his wife at the top of his voice but she feigned not to recognize him and cried out to the people of the house why do you not get up and silent those who are making such a clamor at the door this is an hour to come to the houses of honest folk if my husband were here he was make them desist on hearing his wife's voice the husband called to her as lucky as he could wife open the door are you going to keep me waiting here till morning then when she saw that a lover was ready to set forth she opened the door Oh husband she began how glad I am that you're come I've just had a wonderful dream and was so pleased that I never before a new such delight for it seemed to me that you would recover at the sight of your eye then embracing and kissing him she took him by the head and covering his good eye with one hand she asked him do you not see better than you did before at that moment whilst he saw not a whit she made her lover Sally forth the husband immediately suspected the trick and said to her for God wife I'll keep watch on you no more foreign thinking to deceive you I've myself met with the cunningest deception that ever was devised may God meant you for it is beyond the power of man to put a stop to maliciousness of a woman unless by killing her outright however since the fair treatment I've accorded you has availed nothing for your amendment perchance to score and I shall henceforth hold you in will serve as a punishment so saying he went away leaving his wife in great distress nevertheless by the intercession of his friends and her own excuses and tears he was persuaded to return to her again by this tale ladies you may see how quick and crafty a woman is in escaping from danger and ever would be quick to discover the means of concealing a bad deed it would him I believe be yet more subtle in avoiding evil or in doing good for I've always heard it said that wit to do well is ever the stronger you may talk of your cunning as much as you please set out calm but my opinion is that had the same fortune befallen you you could not have concealed the truth I had as lief you deemed me the most foolish woman on earth she replied I do not say that answered Haier Khan but I think you more likely to become founded by slander and to devise some cunning means to silence it you think said Noah feed that everyone is like you who would use one slander for the patching of another but there is danger less the patch and pear what it patches and the foundation be so overladen that all be destroyed however if you think that a subtlety of which all believe you to be fully possessed is greater than that found in women I yield place to you to tell the seven story and if you bring yourself forward as the hero I doubt not that we shall hear wickedness enough I'm not here or applied hair comb to make myself out worse than I am there are some who do that rather more than is to my liking so saying he looked at his wife who quickly said do not fear to tell the truth on my account I can more easily bear to hear you relate your crafty tricks and to see them play it before my eyes though none of them could lessen the love I bear you for that reason replied heckle I make no complaint of all the false opinions you've had of me and so since we understand each other there will be more security for the future yet I am not so foolish as to relate a story of myself the truth of which might be vexatious to you I will tell you one of a gentleman who was among my dearest friends end of section 14 section 15 of the heptamer run of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by anna simon the hepta marilyn of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury first-day tales 7 in the city of Paris there lived a merchant who was in love with a young girl or his neighbourhood art to speak more truly she was more in love with him than he with her for the show he made to her of love and devotion was but to conceal a loft here and more honorable passion however she suffered herself to be deceived and loved him so much that she had quite forgotten the way to refuse after the merchant had long taken trouble to go where he could see her he at last made her come with us whoever pleased himself her mother discovered this and being a very virtuous woman she forbade her daughter ever to speak to the match and on pain of being sent to a nunnery but the girl whose love for the merchant was greater than her fear of her mother went after him more than ever it happened one day when she was in a closet all alone the merchant came into her and finding himself in a place convenient for the purpose fell to conversing with her as privily as was possible but a maidservant who had seen him go in ran and told the mother who be took herself thither in great wrath when the girl heard her coming she said weeping to the merchant alas sweetheart the love that I bear you will now cost me dear here comes my mother who will know for certain what she has always feared and suspected the merchant who was not a bit confused by this accident straightway left the girl and went to meet the mother stretching out his arms he hooked her with always might and with the same ardour with which he had begun to entertain the daughter through the poor old woman on to a small bed she was so taken aback at being thus treated that she could find nothing to say but what do you want are you dreaming for all that he seized not to press her as closely as if she had been the fairest maiden in the world and had she not cried out so loudly that her serving men and women came to her aid she would have gone by the same road as she feared her daughter was treading however the servants dragged the poor old woman by main falls out of the merchants arms she never knew for what reason he had thus used her meanwhile her daughter took refuge in a house heart by our wedding was going on since then she and the merchants have oft times laughed together at the expense of the old woman who was never any the wiser by this story ladies you may see how by the subtlety of a man an old woman was deceived and the honour of a young one saved anyone who would give the names or it seemed the merchants face and a consternation of the old one would have a very tender conscience to hold from laughing it is sufficient for me to prove to you by this story that a man's wit is as prompt and as helpful at a pinch as a woman's and thus to show you ladies that you need not fear to fall into man's hands if your own wit should fail you you'll find theirs prepare to shield your honor in truth here come sentinels I mean I grant the tale is a very pleasant one and the wit great but the example is not such as maid should follow I readily believe there are some whom you would fain ever prove it but you're not so foolish as to wish that your wife or her whose honor you said higher than her pleasure should play such a game I believe there is none who would watched them more closely or shield them more readily than you by my conscience tzedakah if she whom you mentioned had done such a thing and I knew nothing about it I should think nonetheless of her for all I know someone may have played as good a trick on me however knowing nothing I am unconcerned at this Parliament that could not refrain from saying a wicked man cannot but be suspicious happy are those who give no occasion for suspicion I've never seen a great fire from which they came no smoke said Laura lein but I've often seen smoke where there was no fire the wicked are as suspicious when there is no mischief as when there is truly laundering here come for with rejoined you have spoken so well and supported the honor of ladies wrongfully suspected that I gave you my vote to tell the 8th tale I hope however that you will not make us weep as madam was here did buy too much praise of virtuous women at this lingerie in laughed heartily and thus began you want me to make you laugh as is my want but shall not be at women's expense I will show you however how easy it is to deceive them when they are inclined to be jealous and esteem themselves clever enough to receive their husbands end of section 15 section 16 of the abdomen of the tailless of Margaret queen of Navarre vol 1 this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by Lynn Selva depth Ameren of the tales of Margaret in of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury Appendix A Grille of page 31 the dedication with which Anthony Limassol professes his translation of polka show contains several curious passages in it Margaret is dealt the most high and most illustrious Princess Margaret of France only sister the king queen of Navarre duchess of a young Sue and of Barry while the author describes himself as master and one Limassol consider of the King receiver general of his finances in Burgundy and very humble secretary to the screen then proceed to say you remember my lady the time when you made a stay of for her five months in bodies during which you commanded me saying that I had briefly arrived from Florence where I had sojourned during an entire year to read to you certain stories of the the Camaro of Picasso after which at least you to command me to translate the whole book into our French language assuring me that it would be found beautiful and entertaining I then made your reply that I felt my powers were too weak to undertake such a work my principal and most reasonable excuse was the knowledge that I had of myself being a native of the land of da fini where the maternal language is too far removed from good French however it did not please you to accept and love my excuses and you showed me that it was not fitting that the diskens should be so mistaken as to believe that their Picacho could not be rendered in our language as well as it is in bears ours having become so rich and so copyist since the accession of the King year brother to the crown that nothing has ever been written in any language that could not be expressed in this and thus your will still was that I should translate it the Decameron when I had a leisure to do so saying this and desiring throughout my life to do if I can even more than as possible to obey you I began some time afterwards to translate one of the sad stories didn't to them tree and finally to the number of ten or twelve the best that I could choose which I afterwards showed us much to be love that the sky nation asked the people of ours who all made me believe that the stories were if not perfectly at least very faithfully translated were for allowing myself to be das blessedly deceived if the seat there was I have seen said myself to begin the translation at one end and to finish it at the other this dedicatory Rufus is followed by an epistle written in Italian by Emilio furedi and dated from young me one 15:45 and by a notice to the reader is sang by Ian Ross said the bookseller who in the Kings license dated from some German only November to 15 44 is described as Russ said called the mower bookseller residing in Paris on the bridge of sank mache at the sign of the white rose the first difference of the muscles translation 15:45 was in follow subsequent ones of 1548 1551 1533 being in octave oh it should be remembered that lemma sones was by no means the first french version of the Decameron wrong de première effect had already rendered Boccaccio's masterpiece into french in the reign of charles the sixth but unfortunately his translation although a placing knave day was not at all correct having been made from a latin version of the original manuscript copies of the wrongs translation were to be found in the Royal and most of the princely libraries of the 15th century Edie end of section 16 section 17 of the tamarin of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre for him one this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by anna simon the heptamer on of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre volume 1 by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury section 17 appendix B about tale one of the first day the letters of remission which at the instance of Henry the eighth were granted to Michael The Sentinel in respect of the murder of James demon you are preserved in the National Archives of France register j23 for number 191 and after the usual preamble recite the culprits petition in these terms for as it appears from the prayer of Michael de Santa young lord of the set place that heretofore he for a long time lived and resided in the town of Allen school in honor and good repute but to the detriment of his prosperity life and conduct there were diverse evil minded and envious persons who by sinister cunning and hidden means persecuted him with all the evils Wiles and deceits that it is possible to conceive albert the sets upland had never caused them displeasure injury or detriment among others one named James de manyu a young man to whom the sad suppliant have procured all the pleasure and advantages that were in his power and whom he had customarily admitted to his house thinking that the said de Menil was his loyal friend and charging his wife and his servants to treat him when he came as though he were his brother by which means Sentinel hoped to induce the set de Menil to espouse one of his relatives but de Menil ill required the aforesaid good services and curtsies and rendering evil for good as is the practice of any and effort to and did cause an estrangement between the set Santino and his wife who had always lived together in good great and perfect affection and the better to affect his purpose he de Menil gave the third wife to understand among other things that Sentinel bore her no affection that he daily desired her death that she was mistaken entrusting him and other evil things not fitting to be repeated which the wife withstood and joining de Menil not to use such language again as should he do so she would repeat it to her husband but de manyu persevering on diverse occasions when centaur you had absolute himself gave the wife with a letter to understand that he sat on Young was dead devising proves thereof and conjectures and thinking that by this means he would win her favor and countenance but she still resisted him which seeing the said de Menil gave her to understand that Sentinel would often absent himself and that she would be happier if she had a husband who remained with her and plotting to compassed the death of the set said daniel de Menil gave her to understand that if she would consent to the death of her husband he would marry her and in fact he promised to marry her and whereas she still refused to consent the set de Menil found a means to gain a servant woman of the house who sent a young being absent and his wife in bed opened the door to do menu who compelled the sad wife to let him lie with her and lens forward daemon you may diverse presence to the servant woman so that she should poison the set suppliant and she consented to his face but at easter confess the matter to Santino and treating his forgiveness and also saying and declaring it to the neighbors and thus at de Menil known that he would incur blame and reproach if the matter were brought forward seized and abducted the said servant woman in old diligence and took her away from the town where by a scandal was occasioned moreover it would appear that the said luminol had been found several times by night watching the gardens in a door in view of slaying Santa young and his notorious in Alice all by virtue of the admission of the de Menil himself burp on centinall seeing his wife thus made the subject of scandal by de Menil and joined him to abstain from coming to his house to see his wife and to consider the outrage and injury he had already inflicted upon him declaring moreover that he could endure and no more – which de Menil refused to listen declaring that he would frequent the house in spite of everyone I'll bite in doing so he might come by his death thereupon Santa yo being acquainted with the evil obstinacy of de Menil and desires of avoiding greater misfortune depart from the town of Allan saw and went to reside in the town of argon tone ten leagues distant whether he took his wife thinking that Duminy would abstain from coming with all he did not abstain but came several times to the sad town of our Canton and frequented his sentinels wife whereby the people of Arkansas were scandalized and the said said Daniel endeavoured to prevent him from coming and employed the nurse of his child to remonstrate with de Menil but a letter persevered saying and declaring that he would kill SATA young I would still go to our canto I'll buy that might cause his death in so much that the said bloom anew on the eighth day of this month the part from a little between two and three o'clock in the morning a suspicious hour having disguised himself and assumed attire unsuited to his calling which is that of the law wearing a Viennese cloak a jacket of white wool and stuff underneath all torn into strips with a feathered cap upon his head and having his face covered in this wise he arrived at the set town of Arkansaw accompanied by two young men and lodged in the folk works at the sign of not Sodom and remained there clandestinely from noon till about eleven o'clock in the evening when he asked the host for the key of the back door so that he might go out on his private affairs not wishing to be recognized at the set suspicious hour with his sword at his side and dressed Anna could hurt in the said garments he started from his lodging with one of the sad young man in this wise de Menil reached the house of Santa yo which he found a means of entering and gained a closet up above near the room with said Santana on his wife slept since onion was without thought of this in as much as he was ignorant the enterprise of this abdominal being in the living room with one master Toma Garen who had come upon business now as Sentinel was disposing himself to go to bed he told one of his servants named Kola to bring him his curse and the servant have an occasion to go up into a closet in which Santana's wife was sleeping and in which the set de Menil was concealed the letter fearing that he might be recognized suddenly came out with a drawn sword in his hand whereupon the set kala cried help there's a robber and he declared to Santa Yong that he had seen a strange man who did not seem to be there for any good purpose whereupon Santa young set him one must find out who it is is there occasion for anyone to come here at this hour thereupon Kola went after the set personage whom he found in a little alley near the courtyard behind the house and the set personage having suddenly perceived color and never to strike him on the body with his weapon but kala withstood him and gave him a few blows for which reason he cried out help murder thereupon Santa young arrived having a sword in his hand and after him came to set Garin said Don Young who has yet did not know demon eel on account of his disguise and also because it was wonderfully dark found him calling out murder confession by which cry the said sat on young knew him and was greatly perplexed astonished and angered at seeing his enemy at such an hour in his house he having been found there with a weapon in the closet and said Sentinel recalling to memory that trouble and worry that de Menil had caused him dealt him two or three thrusts in hot anger and then said to him hey ret that thou art what has brought me here where they are not content with the wrong doubt ditched me and coming here previously I never did the until office whereupon the set de Menil said it is true I have two grievously offended you and am too wicked I entreat your pardon and thereupon he fell to the ground of dead witch seeing the sets and Daniel realizing the misfortune that had happened said not a word but recommended himself to God and withdrew into his room where he found his wife in bed she having heard nothing on the night of the sad dispute and a little later since on young went to see what I said demon II was doing and finding him in the courtyard dead he helped to carry him into the stable being too greatly incensed to act otherwise and upon the said kala asking him what should be done with the body sent an young paid no heed to this question because it was not master of himself but merely said to kala that he might do as he thought fit and that the body might be interred in consecrated ground or placed in the street after which Santonio withdrew into his room and slept with his wife who had her maids with her and on the morrow the same color declare does Santa know that he had taken the set body to be buried so as to avoid a scandal to all of which things sent on young paid no heed but on the morrow sent to fetch the two young men in the service of the ceremonial who were his lodging and that the host is removed with said lodging and gave orders to one of the young men to take them back on account of all which occurrences he sent on young absented himself etcetera etc but humbly and treating us etc etc wherefore we now give to the bailiffs of shaft and or to their left tenants and to each of them severally and to all etc etc given chatelet ho in the month of July the year of grace 1526 and the 12th of our reign signed by the king on the report of the council DiNozzo visa content to DiNozzo it will be seen that the foregoing petition contains various contradictory statements the closet for instance is at first describes being near the room in which Santino and his wife slept then it is asserted that the wife slept in the closet but ultimately the husband is shown joining his wife in the bedchamber where she'd heard nothing the character of the narrative is proof of its falsity and Margaret's account of the affair may readily be accepted as the more correct one editor end of section 17 section 18 of that Tamron of the tales of Margaret queen of Navarre for him one this is a librivox recording all librivox recordings are in the public domain for more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org recording by Ella seaman Knapp Tyrone of the tales of Margaret queen of Navarre for him one by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury Appendix C tale for levity dumb gallant contains the following passage bearing upon Margaret's fourth tale Selah lungs addition of pontoons work volume 9 page 678 at SEC quote I've heard a lady of great and ancient rank relate that a late Cardinal EE whilst the bishop and Cardinal married madam – Aston and died married and this lady said it in conversing with Monsieur demand a Provencal of the house of sulla and Bishop of Fraser who had attended the set Cardinal during 15 years at the court of Rome and had been one of his private pro two notaries the conversation turning up on the set Cardinal this lady asked me sure the man if he the Cardinal had ever said and confessed to him that he had been married it was Massoud a man who was astonished at such a question he is still alive and can say if I'm telling an untruth for I was there he replied that he had never heard the matter spoken of either to himself or to others then it is I who inform you of it said she for nothing could be more true but that he was married and died really married – madam Lucius you I assure you that I laughed heartily contemplating the astonished countenance of monsieur de man who was most conscientious and religious and thought that he had known all the secrets of his late master but he was as ignorant as a Gibbon as regards that one which was indeed scan on account of the holy rank what he Cardinal du Bellay had held this madam nauseous you'll was the widow of the late monsieur de Serre CEO of whom it was said that he governed the little King Charles the eighth with partying and Bonneville who governed the royal blood he died at Ferrara where he had been taken to have his wound dressed having been wounded at the siege of Ravenna this lady became a widow when very young and beautiful and on account of her being sensible and virtues she was elected as a lady of honor the late Queen of Navarre it was she who gave that fine advice to that lady ingrate princess which is recorded in the hundred stories of the sad Queen the story of herself and gentlemen who'd slipped into her bed during the night by a trapdoor at the bedside and who wished to enjoy her but only obtained by it some fine scratches upon his handsome face she the Queen wishing to complain to her brother Madame the chaste you made her that fine remonstrance which will be seen in the story and gave her that beautiful advice which is one of the finest most judicious a most fitting that could be given to avoid scandal did it come even from a first president of the Parliament of Paris yet it well showed that the lady was quite as artful and shrewd in such secret matters as she was sensible and prudent and for this reason there is no need for doubt as to whether she kept her affair with a cardinal a secret my grandmother Madame la escena shall what to had her place after her death by election of King Francis who chose and elected her and sent to fetch her even in her house and gave her with his own hand to the Queen his sister foreigner to be a very well advised and very virtuous lady but not so shrewd or artful or ready with it in such matters as her predecessor or married either a second time and if you wish to know to whom the story applies it is to the queen of Navarre herself and Admiral de bonne Yvette as I hold it for my late grandmother and yet it seems to me that the sad Queen should not have concealed her name since the other could not obtain alt from our chasity but went off in confusion and since she herself had meant to divulge the matter had it not been for the fine and sensible remonstrance which was made to her by the sad lady of honor madam the Shasta you who ever has read this story will find that she was a lady of honor and I think that that Cardinal her sad husband who was one of the best speakers and most learned eloquent wise and shrewd men of his time must have instilled into her the signs of speaking and remonstrating so well and quote Bantam also refers to the story in question in his Vedas ohm illustrate a concomitant concern for him to page 162 brainy says quote there is a tale in the stories of the queen of Navarre which speaks of a load the favorite of a king whom he invited with all his court to one of his houses where he made a trapdoor in his room conducting to the bedside of a great princess in view of lying with her as he did but as the story relates he obtained only scratches from her end quote end of section 18 end of the heptamer own of the tales of margaret queen of Navarre for him won by Margaret of Navarre translated by George Sainsbury

Heptameron of the Tales of Margaret, Queen of Navarre, Vol. 1 | Marguerite of Navarre | 3/3

9: [00:00:00] – First Day, Tale I

10: [00:19:02] – First Day, Tale II

11: [00:27:41] – First Day, Tale III

12: [00:42:41] – First Day, Tale IV

13: [00:59:41] – First Day, Tale V

14: [01:08:23] – First Day, Tale VI

15: [01:14:28] – First Day, Tale VII

16: [01:20:17] – Appendix A, Prologue

17: [01:26:12] – Appendix B, Tale I

18: [01:37:18] – Appendix C, Tale IV

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